Shooting in the Shallows

Published December 30, 2016 in DIVING & SNORKELING, Snorkeling, Underwater Photography

Going below

Not every shot works from the surface. The ability to perform reasonable breath-hold dives opens up yet another realm of imaging possibilities. When it comes time to duck below the surface for a shot, the chances of success can be greatly increased by making all possible preparations prior to submerging. While relaxing on the surface, visualize the details of the shot such as the composition, camera position and lighting. This is the time to make adjustments to strobe arms and set focal lengths and other settings. If you are working with a moving subject, this also provides time to note and anticipate it’s behavior patterns. Once all is ready, you can then submerge and capture the image without wasting valuable breath-hold time futzing with the mechanics of the shot. Back on the surface, you can then review your results, make any needed tweaks or adjustments to the settings, and repeat the process.

Taking time on the surface to make adjustments to your strobes, set focal lengths and other settings is a good habit to employ. This allows you to submerge and capture the image without wasting valuable breath-hold time. Photo by Walt Stearns

Taking time on the surface to make adjustments to your strobes, set focal lengths and other settings is a good habit to employ. This allows you to submerge and capture the image without wasting valuable breath-hold time. Photo by Walt Stearns

Whether your objective is to capture a wide angle scenic or a close up of a feisty mantis shrimp, Wakatobi's shallow reefs and inshore grass beds provide a wealth of photo opportunities for snorkelers of all skill levels. Photo by Walt Stearns

Wakatobi’s shallow reefs and inshore grass beds make it easy to create stellar images while snorkeling, whether you are looking to capture a wide angle scenic or a close up of a feisty mantis shrimp or other tiny subject. Photo by Walt Stearns

Shallow is still best

Snorkelers with superior breath-hold diving skills are often tempted to go deeper in search of different subjects. But even accomplished free divers typically achieve better results by sticking closer to the surface, both for the greater availability of light, and for physical comfort and safety. It’s always best to snorkel in the company of a buddy, and this practice becomes vital to personal safety when breath hold dives of any significant depth are added to the equation. Fortunately, there are dozens of sites around Wakatobi Resort—including the House Reef—where corals rise to within a meter of the surface, creating endless hours of imaging possibilities.

Immerse yourself in nature at its finest and most pristine–plan your trip today. It’s time for you to experience all that Wakatobi has to offer. Contact us at office@wakatobi.com or complete a quick trip inquiry at wakatobi.com.

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